Yes, and… What did we learn?

Posted: July 6, 2018 in facilitation, Team
Tags: , , , ,

Image result for yes but improv gameRecently my team played a loose version of the “Yes, But” improv game at the beginning of a retrospective (retro) as an icebreaker. I say loose, because we played it in a round (rather than in pairs) and did two rounds. I started each round with the same statement: “I think we should have snacks at Retro” (this is something that often comes up – tongue-in-cheek – during retro conversations).

For round one, the next person in line always had to respond starting with “Yes, but”. At the end of the round (we were seated in a circle), I asked the group to silently pay attention to how they felt and what they experienced during the exercise.

For round two, the next person in line had to respond starting with “Yes, and…”. At the end of the second round I asked some questions about how the team experienced both rounds:

  • How did the first round feel?
  • How did the second round feel?
  • What made a round difficult?
  • What did or could you do to make a round easier?
  • What does this mean for how we respond to each other as a team?

Interestingly (and unexpectedly), my team struggled more with the “Yes, and” round than the “Yes, but” round. To the extent that one team member couldn’t even think of something to say for the “Yes, and” round! At first I was a little stumped, but as we discussed further we realised that:

  1. As a team, we found it more natural to poke holes in ideas rather than add to ideas we didn’t completely agree with.
  2. When we didn’t agree completely with a statement, we got “stuck” and couldn’t think (easily) of a way to add to the statement.

As an example for point 2, above, one person responded to the statement with: “Yes, and we will need to do exercise”. The person following them really struggled to respond (because they don’t like exercise) and didn’t really come up with anything convincing. As a group, after some thought, we eventually realised that “Yes, and it can be optional” would have been a perfectly valid response. However, as a group, it took us a while to get there. So it definitely wasn’t something that came naturally to us.

For me, these were quite cool insights, and probably good for a team to be aware of, particularly when we’re struggling with new problems or trying to find creative solutions.

Have you tried similar games? What did you learn or experience? How has it helped your team?

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