Posts Tagged ‘product owner’

I not-so-recently attended the regional Scrum Gathering for 2017 in Cape Town. This is a post in a series on some of the talks that I attended. All posts are based on the sketch-notes that I took in the sessions. 

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I think a better title for this talk by Gavin Stevens would have been “How to be an awesome Product Owner”.

The basic structure of this talk for Product Owners was:

  1. A dysfunction and how you will notice it
  2. What you (as the Product Owner) can do about it
  3. Some ideas for how you can take action

The seven dysfunctions that Gavin touched on were:

  1. The team has lost sight of the vision
  2. The Corporate Mentality is that the PO is the leader of the team
  3. The team is not autonomous in the sprint
  4. The team isn’t motivated to finish the sprint early
  5. The PO is the middle man
  6. The PO needs to check everything
  7. The PO is not with the team

The team has lost sight of the vision

What you will notice are “weird” statements or questions like:

  • “How does this fit in?”
  • “Why now?”
  • “If I had known…”

The solution is to ask the team those weird questions when they are planning / discussing their work before the sprint starts.

Corporate Mentality: the PO is the leader

You will hear language like “Gavin and team”. Or “well done to Gavin for this great delivery”. The organisation has not yet realised that the PO is a leader – not THE leader.

What you need to do is create an understanding of the team structure. That the team structure is flat and that there is no single leader in a self-organising team.

The team is not autonomous in the sprint

The team doesn’t seem to be able to make decisions about how they work in the sprint. You, as the PO, are always the “go-to” guy.

What you need to do is empower the team.

Some ways you can do this are:

  • Don’t interfere during the sprint. Trust that the team knows what the goal is (because that was your job) and let them decide how to achieve it.
  • You make the decisions about why, and maybe what, but never how.

The team is not motivated to finish the sprint early

The team doesn’t seem motivated to try to achieve the sprint goal before the end of the sprint. This may be because, as soon as they finish, more work is automatically added to the sprint.

You need to create space. People need time to be creative. One way to achieve this is to tell the team that when they hit the sprint goal, the remainder of the sprint time is theirs to do with what they please.

Gavin mentioned that what the team then chooses to do is also often insightful. If they’re bought into the roadmap, they’ll usually choose to pick up the next pieces on the backlog. If they choose to do something completely different, then it’s usually a good idea to question why they feel that the work they chose to do is more valuable.

The Product Owner is the Middle Man

Which also means the PO is a blocker. Because if you’re not there, everything stops.

Some of the signs that you are a blocker are:

  1. You are the admin secretary who needs to check everything before the team releases
  2. Selfish backlogs – no one besides the PO is allowed to touch the Product Backlog
  3. You are a layer between the team and stakeholders

If you find the reason you are checking everything at the end is because it’s not aligned to what you expected, then you need to examine all the up-front areas where you are responsible for conveying what the team needs to deliver the right thing

  • Have you communicated the vision properly?
  • Did you help the team ask (and answer) the right questions in grooming and planning?

Once you believe that you have given the team the right information to build the right thing, then make each team member the “final checker”. Any team member can do that final check that something is ready to release (because a second set of eyes is usually a good thing – it just doesn’t need to always be the PO).

Fixing selfish backlogs is “relatively” easy – let others add to the Backlog. Ordering is still your decision, but what goes onto the list can be from anyone.

The Product Owner needs to check everything

The reason for this is normally related to a lack of trust: this happens when the PO doesn’t trust the team. Some of the signs are the same as when the PO is the middle man.

Building trust is a two-way street: the team need to trust the PO as much as the PO needs to trust the team.

One way to build trust is to create a safe space. Do this by

  • Allowing team members to learn from their mistakes
  • Not blaming
  • Protecting the team from external factors
  • Taking the fall when necessary

A second way to build trust is to tell team members that you trust them. For example, when a team member says “I’ve done all the tests and I think this is ready to go. Can we release?”, then don’t answer with a yes. Rather say “I trust you know when it is ready so you can make that call”.

The Product Owner is not with the team

The Product Owner needs to be available – to the team and to stakeholders. Although the PO should not be a middle man, one of the main functions of the role is to act as a translator between the team and stakeholders. How much you need to sit with your team does depends, and is somewhere on a continuum between “Always” and “Never”.

Some things you can try to make yourself more available are:

  1. Don’t schedule/accept consecutive meetings
  2. If you do have downtime and work in an environment where working distributed would be an option, rather choose to spend it at your desk if possible.

 

I found this an interesting talk and what was especially great was it paralleled much of what we have experienced as a team. Are you a Product Owner? What are your thoughts on what Gavin had to say?

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