Posts Tagged ‘techniques’

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAPSAAAAJGQ2MTIzYzU1LWM0MjItNDJjZS1iYWM2LWYxZDVmNzJmY2M4ZQ.jpgI may have mentioned it before, but at the beginning of the year I went on wonderful facilitation training which led to some positive work-related changes plus a long list of ideas and possible actions for me to try. Some I haven’t got round to (yet) while others I have been actively working on. Here are some of my thoughts on the latter.

(Side note: the format is the format we were asked to use when making our list – and I quite like it.)

I will use question agendas and review these before and during the session so that there is buy-in and we’re talking about what the group feels we need to talk about

I have been using questions agendas quite actively and have found one additional benefit is that they help formalise my own thinking around outcomes and flows for the sessions, particularly workshops.

One thing I have learned is – when running through the agenda – particularly for longer workshops – don’t just read down the list. Try and tie the parts together (like a story) so that the room gets a sense of the journey we’re taking. Also keep an eye out for nodding heads (a good sign).

So far…

  • I’ve had one session where the team members actually kept each other on track with each step by referring back to where we were in the agenda (I tend to pair the agenda with a task board to show when we’re busy with a topic or done).
  • In another session, the group went off on a technical tangent, and then brought themselves back to review whether they were actually answering the questions they were meant to.
  • In a third session, the group actually added an item to the agenda (admittedly, the item was “we find out what the cake tastes like” 😉 )

I will spend more time thinking about WIIFM so that I can try create excitement for a session

(WIIFM = What’s In It For Me)

I could probably focus a little more on this one, particularly using the information to help make sessions more exciting. Since the training, I’ve tried to be more explicit about ensuring I understand all aspects of a meeting (Purpose, Outcomes & Deliverables, WIIFM, and Roles and Responsibilities), particularly when the session is for someone else. We do tend to spend more time on the Purpose and Outcomes & Deliverables. I could probably still do more here…

I will assume yes and ask the follow-up questions so that the team is involved in the conversation and it’s not all about me

I’ve found this technique so useful that I wrote a blog post about it.

I will be more aware of where I am standing so that I leverage physical location as a chicken

I’ve tried this with mixed feelings about its success with my one team during stand-up (the idea being that if you don’t have work on the board, you stand OUTSIDE the inner circle). It’s been more interesting on the other team because soon after I joined they started doing distributed/remote stand-ups, so physical location is not something one can really experiment with. It certainly is very powerful, and I’m currently part of a coaching program where I’m trying to increase my awareness of how I use my body to communicate, particularly when stressed, so perhaps there’s still something to be explored with this one.


In total, I had about twelve ideas on my list that I wanted to try. As you can see, I’ve only really worked with a couple so far. Probably time to try one or two more and see what I learn 🙂

What have you tried recently to try improve how you facilitate sessions or interact with your teams? How did it go?

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top-30-open-ended-questions-570x375I’ve always been aware that open-ended questions are good. They allow someone to answer from their perspective and context rather than being constrained to the limitations imposed by your yes/no options. They also allow someone to challenge an assumption or idea (“How do I look in this dress?”) in a way that is potentially less confrontational (“Does this dress make me look fat?”).

All that said, even after some training in “better questions”, I often find myself regressing back to the good old yes/no in conversations – usually without even being aware of it. That is, until I went on some awesome Agile Facilitation training recently where we learnt a really useful trick:
1. Assume the answer to your question is “yes” (Do we have anything to share with the other teams?)
2. Ask the follow-up question (What will we be sharing with the other teams?)

Ta-da: easy peasy open-ended question! And, if you’re worried about the fact that the answer to your yes/no question may actually be no, if you think about it “no one” or “nothing” are both valid responses to an open-ended question.

I still ask yes/no questions. I am trying very hard not to (especially when facilitating). This trick seems to have helped me become better at self-correcting and gives me an easy way to figure what I can ask instead.

This trick has helped me immensely. Give it a try. Let me know what you discover.

#SGZA 2016: “Just Right”

Posted: November 17, 2016 in Agile, Team
Tags: , , , ,

I recently attended the regional Scrum Gathering for 2016 in Cape Town. This is a post in a series on the talks that I attended. All posts are based on the sketch-notes that I took in the sessions. 

Danie Roux gave an entertaining opening keynote which started off with a re-telling of the well-known fairy tale: Goldilocks and the Three Bears. We also touched on the adventures of Cinderella (and her glass slipper) and the Hunchback of Notre Dame during the talk. Danie challenged us to consider the modern versions of the fairy tales (Shu) against the logic they contained (Ha – or huh?) and their actual origins in history (Ri). Besides some fascinating facts about the origins of some fairy tales, other take-outs from his talk were:

  1. Perspective matters.
  2. Roles are meaningless on their own – they need to be considered in the context of a relationship.
  3. A cadence is a pause. Pauses between notes create music.
  4. The three hardest things to get a team to do are: (1) Talk (2) Talk to each other; and (3) Talk to each other about work.
  5. The definition of ScrumBut: (ScrumBut)(Reason)(Workaround)
    1. Translation: When we say Scrum But we usually go “this is what Scrum would recommend”, “but this is why it won’t work for us”, “so this is what we’ll do instead”
    2. Perhaps we should try for Scrum And?

Finally, he told us the story of his friend and the glass Sable antelope… As a reminder that when we give someone a gift, we cannot be upset with what they do with it (even if they destroy it), regardless of what we invested in getting it for them.

Some references from the talk:

Anything in there that you found interesting?

This is a post in a series on the talks that I attended at my first ever Agile Africa Conference in Johannesburg. All posts are based on the sketch-notes that I took in the sessions. 

Some of the slots were really short, which meant speakers couldn’t really go into a lot of detail. These are sketch-notes from some of the shorter talks.

Popcorn Flow

agileafrica.JPG  popcornflow

Find out more: https://popcornflow.com/

 

 

Leader Transformation

agileafrica

The full title of this case study was “Leader Transformation – a side effect of an agile transition”.

Key take-outs for me:

  • Different parties have different motives and often change driven from the top is feared or regarded as a ‘fad’ to ‘survive’.
  • Beware early successes- sometimes they create a false sense of confidence which leads to running before one can properly walk
  • Start from where you are

Mob Programming Case Study

mob

An interesting talk on the before and after effects of having a team practice mob programming. Some of my key take-outs for if you want to try it:

  • Start by following the rules and then inspect and adapt.
  • There are some things where mob programming doesn’t work very well, e.g. doing research, where learning is not an outcome of the work, and problems that are still very large.
  • You need to mob program with a cross-functional team with all the perspectives (problem knowledge, testing expertise, developers, UX, etc.).
  • You also need to create time for team members to do things on their own i.e. not all of their day is spent with the ‘mob’. This “alone time” could be spent on things that aren’t suited to mob programming and/or other creative initiatives.

 

This is a post in a series on the talks that I attended at my first ever Agile Africa Conference in Johannesburg. All posts are based on the sketch-notes that I took in the sessions. 

I’m not sure if you recall our first experiment with self-selection? Imagine my surprise when I realised that our keynote speaker on the topic, Sandy Mamoli, was the very same person who had been part of the team that created the material we’d used for our own self-selection attempts. As we’d also run a second less successful experiment, I was quite interested to hear a little more “from the horse’s mouth”, so to speak.

agileafrica.JPG

There were some key points shared by Sandy that helped me understand a little more why our second attempt had not succeeded from an expected outcome perspective, but had, in fact, succeeded from a feedback perspective.

  1. Purpose is important. Squads form around a strong purpose that they can buy into.
  2. Self-selection will always fail if management selection is going to be done afterwards to ‘tweak’ the outcomes. (Her solution: make the blueprints for the new squads very visible everywhere as soon as possible after the session.)
  3. She shared a story where squads would not form around a particular vision or goal and usually where that happened there were deeper issues at the root which needed to be resolved before a team would be successful.
  4. Self-selection should NOT directly or explicitly impact reporting lines.

So, upon reflection, after comparing our first and second experiment and adding in some of the tips from Sandy, these were my conclusions:

  • Self-selection should happen independently of reporting lines
    • The first time we did it, there was no impact on reporting lines; the second time we did it, reporting lines were impacted by which squad you moved into.
  • Try keep “people owners” as observers not players
    • There was a subtle form of “Liar Liar” in our second attempt as every time there was a significant shift in numbers to one or other ‘cost center’ then the managers (who were also the Product Owners) had a quick chat about how to re-balance things. In our first experiment, everyone remained in the same “cost center”.
  • Ensure the Product Owners are well prepared in terms of their vision
    • The second time we ran self-selection, one Product Owner had a very clear and mature view of what the squad would be achieving; whereas the other Product Owner was new to the space and hadn’t really had time to formulate their thinking and strategy properly.

Sandy also advised the following:

  • Where squads have fully formed after a couple of rounds, move forward with those squads (regardless of the state of the others).
  • Where squads aren’t fully formed because there just aren’t enough people, have the squad members identify what ‘imaginary friends’ they need to ‘hire’ to form a full squad.
  • Where squads haven’t formed for less obvious reasons and/or people refuse to participate in the process (and choose no-squad), revert to traditional management selection for those people and root cause the reasons for the resistance.

This keynote was very valuable to me as it shifted my perspective of our second attempt from being a failure to being a great source of useful feedback about the state of a particular space. Have you tried self-selection? What was the outcome? What did you learn?

 

This is a post in a series on the talks that I attended at my first ever Agile Africa Conference in Johannesburg. All posts are based on the sketch-notes that I took in the sessions. 

agileafricaSam and Karen started by clarifying what they meant by distributed teams: teams that don’t sit in the same location. They then categorised distributed teams into three main categories:

  1. Teams that work in the same time zone and/or the majority of their working/office hours overlap
  2. Teams that work in different time zones but there is some overlap of working/office hours
  3. Teams that work in different time zones or have different shifts so that there is no overlap of working/office hours.

For each, they then shared some common characteristics and where best to focus energy.

Full Overlap

These teams are characterised by synchronous communication. Here the best focus would be on technology and tools to ensure that communication is as easy as possible when people are distributed. They suggested some ideas like a video wall (expensive option) or running Skype continuously in the background (cheap option) to allow synchronous communication and cues to happen as naturally as possible.

Partial Overlap

Communication in these teams is largely asynchronous (e.g. email), so time together is valuable. Rather than use this time for things that can be communicated is an asynchronous manner, focus on using team time to create understanding. A practical example in the Scrum world is rather than use overlapping time for something like a stand-up (which can also be done via an update in most cases), use it for things like Grooming and Planning where more complicated conversations are required to flesh out understanding and work through difficult problems.

No Overlap

Their main ideas here related to being creative with

  • Tools e.g. creating a video for reviews and stand-up that can be distributed to the other team(s)
  • Rotating a team member who “takes one for the team” and changes their office hours so that there is some overlap with the other team(s).
  • Planning work to try to keep work where there are dependencies in teams that are working in similar time zones.

Besides the advice above, they also had the following general tips:

  • Use Good Technology
  • Have and Use Working Agreements
    • “Bottom Line” – a phrase used when people start to waffle and need to get to the point
    • Talking Over – agreement on what happens if people talk over each other. One idea is to give the facilitator permission to provide the order of who speaks in what order.
    • Multiple back-up plans – So if (when) the technology fails, everyone automatically knows which one to try next (and it doesn’t need to be discussed)
    • Silence – Silence is OK
  • Good Voice Trumps Bad Video
  • Same Experience for All
    • If one person needs to dial in, then everyone should dial in
  • Prepare
    • Prepare for sessions more than you would for face-to-face: agendas, tools, pre-reading, etc.

You can find more tips at RemoteAgileCoach.com.

I’ve shared some of my thoughts on distributed teams in a previous post. What have your experiences been with working on a Distributed Team?

Dark Stories

Posted: August 19, 2016 in Team
Tags: , ,

darkstoriesI was following one of the Australian Agile conferences on Twitter recently and someone posted something about a talk on “Black Stories”. The click-trail eventually led me to this link and I decided that the card game sounded quite appealing (regardless of whether it would prove to be useful as a tool or not). A search for “Black Stories” for sale to South Africans almost ended in vain, but thankfully I decided to submit a query to http://www.timelessboardgames.co.za/ and they got back to me almost immediately to say that they had a set of “Dark Stories” in stock. A quick Google confirmed that this was the equivalent thing and, seeing as it was a Friday afternoon and I was in the mood for shopping, I ordered a box, which arrived the following week.

Since then, I’ve played a couple of games with my team. Our organisation has a horrid culture of people being late for meetings (generally five minutes; when I’m planning a session I always plan for at least 10 minutes) so having something for us to do while people dribbled in seemed a great idea. And, if it encouraged people to get there on time, even better! At first, people didn’t really figure out what was going on (I only play one card per session and we time-box it to 10 minutes, so sometimes people arrive after we’re done) but they’re slowly getting the hang of it and I have noticed that the percentage of on-time arrivals is increasing. I also like that it encourages some lateral thinking, which is also something we don’t practice very often in our day-to-day, so hopefully it will stimulate some more creative problem-solving too.

So far, I haven’t managed to take my box home yet to play it in my personal capacity, but that’s OK. A chance to make meetings more fun is far more valuable. If you’ve been struggling with this or getting people to rooms on time, I’d really give this a try. Do you have any other easy tricks or tools you’ve used in the past to set a good tone for a meeting or encourage other helpful behaviours?