A Freddy Mercury (Virtual) Retrospective

Posted: November 20, 2020 in Agile, facilitation, Scrum
Tags: , , ,

I did this retrospective with one of my teams recently, and seeing as the feedback afterwards was really positive, I thought I would share. First off, kudos to The Virtual Agile Coach for creating this retrospective in the first place. I don’t have a paid Miro account so had to recreate the experience in Powerpoint (file attached), but he had done the heavy lifting and Miro templates are available on his amazing site for those with the power to import.

Some context to add is that I have had some push-back from the team in the past when it came to activities in meetings that they did not regard as “work”. For example, some people don’t like random check-ins while others complain when we have to interact with a visual aid (“can’t we just talk?”). As an experiment, for this retrospective, I explained the “why” behind each of the facilitation activities I was using. And I believe it helped 🙂

Another note is that although I have indicated the timeboxes I used, it’s worth mentioning that this was a fairly large group (14 people) which brings its own challenges. For example, if you have a smaller team, then potentially break-out rooms would not be necessary.

1) Setting the Scene [10 minutes]

First I shared the Miro board link in the chat (I had already shared it before the session, but wanted to make sure everyone could get there) while we were waiting for people to join.

Then we started with an activity. I pasted the following instruction in the chat:

Take turns to answer this
==========================
What FRUIT are you today? (and, if you want to share, why?)

We used https://wheeldecide.com/ (which I had set up with the team names and to remove an entry after each spin) to decide the order for people to share in.

I also gave the instructions verbally.

Before we started, I explained why we were doing the activity:
“When a person doesn’t speak at the beginning of a meeting, that person has tacit permission to remain silent for the rest of the session (and often will). We want to ensure that no one has a subconscious barrier to speaking up in our retrospective because it is important that everyone feels able to contribute equally.”

Remember to pause before you spin the wheel for the first time so people have a chance to think about what they will answer.

After the “fruit” check-in, we went to the Miro board and I reminded everyone why we did retrospectives (The Agile Principle) and the mindset we were meant to have during the discussion (The Prime Directive). I also ran through the agenda.

2) Gather Data (1): Silent Writing [4 minutes]

Gather Data

I pasted the next instruction into the chat before I started speaking (it included a link to the correct Miro frame):

Silent writing for 4 minutes. Add stickies to the sections on the Miro board.

I explained why we were doing silent writing:
“Some people need time to stop and think or are not able to think while other people are talking. We’d like to give those people a chance to gather their thoughts before we move into a stage where we want them to listen to the “speak to think” people in the room. Another reason we’re doing silent writing is it is easier for the human brain to stay engaged and focused when we engage at least two of our senses. So in this instance people are seeing and typing (movement). And having a whiteboard in general means you can capture notes (movement) and listen at the same time. Another reason it’s good to capture notes is sometimes people might have to step away, or will be briefly distracted, and then there is a visual representation of what they might have missed and they can catch up with the rest of the group. We also have some team members who cannot be here today, and this creates something they can refer to when they are back at work. Lastly, our brains can only hold 5-8 items at any one time, so by writing down our thoughts before we move into conversation, it means we can focus on listening rather than trying to remember what we want to say.”

I then reiterated the instruction and played the song “Another One Bites the Dust” while they performed the activity (because the length of the song is almost 4 minutes).

3) Gather Data (2): Conversation [6 minutes]

Once again, I started with pasting the instructions (the same link as for silent writing) into the chat:

--- Breakout Rooms: Discuss Queen ----
Discuss what's been written. Add any new thoughts.

I explained that we would be going into break-out rooms of 3-4 people randomly assigned by Zoom and that each group would have about five minutes to discuss what they could see on the board plus add any new thoughts out of the discussion.

I explained why we were using breakout rooms:
“We want everyone to have a chance to speak, and because we are so many people, to do so in one group would take a long time. Breaking up into smaller groups means we can have some of those conversations in parallel. It’s also easier for people to connect online when they are in a smaller group and our brains find smaller groups less tiring, particularly when using a tool like Zoom.”

I then repeated the instructions and sent everyone into break-out rooms.

4) Generate Insights [15 – 17 minutes]

Generate Insights

Once everyone was back, I added the next instruction to the chat (with a new link to the relevant frame on Miro):

----- Breakout Rooms: Generate Insights ---
Talk about what stands out? What surprised you? What patterns do you see? What is missing?
(You can add notes -> miro_link )

I then told the group we would be going into break-out rooms again (this time with new people) and this time the idea was to step back and look for patterns or trends. To try see things from a new/different perspective. I mentioned that the instructions were in the chat and that there was a space on the Miro board to add notes (if they wanted to). I also said that we would be having a debrief of what was discussed as a single group when everyone came back from the break-out rooms.

Before I opened the new rooms, I checked in as to whether the first break-out slot had been long enough. One group mentioned that they hadn’t really managed to get to everything so, as we were running ahead of schedule, I added an extra two minutes to the five-minute break-out room timebox.

While people were in the break-out rooms, I added a funny hat to my Zoom attire.

When everyone had returned from the break-out rooms, we made time for discussions. This is where, as a facilitator, you need to be prepared for awkward silences! Once the first group had had their turn, things flowed again. I was ready to add any additional comments/notes that came out of the debrief however, in this instance, there were none.

5) What could we do? [5 minutes]

The chat instruction:

Please add ideas for what we can try next sprint to the "Ideas" section -> miro_link
We will then have a 10 minute break until xx:xx

I explained that we had gathered data and highlighted any trends or observations, and now we had to decide what we wanted to try in our next sprint. The first part of that process was to capture and share our ideas. We would do this by having five minutes of silent writing, followed by a 10 minute break, and when we returned after our break we would discuss the ideas on the board. I told the team that I would be playing music for the silent-writing part, however people could use the time as they chose, as long as they had captured their ideas by the time we returned from our break. After checking for any questions, I started playing the song: “I want it all“.

While the song was playing, I kept my camera on as a visible indication that the break hadn’t officially started. When the song finished playing, I turned my camera and microphone off (we generally stay in the Zoom room for breaks) and re-iterated in the chat window what time everyone was expected to be back.

6) What will we do? [Remainder of the timebox – approx 30 min]

I changed my Zoom hat again for the final part of the session, and reminded the team that we were aiming to shape our ideas into at least one action or first step that we wanted to try in our next sprint. We started with a debrief of the ideas that had been added to the board, particularly the ones that were not so specific and more like thinking items (so that we could generate some specific ideas for what we could try).

Once we were done discussing, we used Menti to rank vote the actions we’d come up with. One could also use something like dot voting. I used Menti because my team are familiar with Menti and I find it’s quicker to update ‘just in time’. As an aside, before we rank vote, we also usually get the team’s input as to the impact/effort for each of the proposed actions. For this session, it actually led to further discussion, because one team member realised that they didn’t know enough about the action to be able to rate the effort to do it.

Effort vs Impact of Actions

Once ranked, we took the top ranked action and ensured that it was SMART. At that point we were out of time, so I asked the team if we were OK to end the session. Sometimes in the past we have decided to take more than one action into our sprint (but we try limit it to no more than three).

We also always do a fist-to-five to ensure everyone can live with the SMART action(s) as described. I like to use a Zoom poll for this.

7) Close

To close the session, I re-capped what we had done during the session (starting with the check-in activity) and that we had agreed to one action for the next sprint. I reminded people who had specific actions from our discussions about their tasks. Finally, I asked the team if they would give me feedback on Miro by

  1. Dragging a dot to rate the retrospective out of five
  2. Where they had comments (things to keep doing, things to stop doing), adding those thoughts to a sticky

And, with that, we thanked each other and ended our sprint retrospective.


If you give a similar retrospective a try, let me know how it goes. I would be interested what did and did not work for you and your team.

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